Fall colours in Ontario - Maple Tree in Autumn

Why is my D300s shutter speed so slow?

We all know what happens when you get a new (replacement) for something; suddenly the older product just feels so inferior, so outdated? You immediately relegate it to a corner, let it collect dust and try to forget about the investment you had made, which now is surely obsolete. Well, that’s what happened to my Nikon D300s when I bought the new Nikon D600. It sat on my shelf, looking lonely, without a lens or battery, until one day I rediscovered why I had loved it so much. It’s because it JUST WORKS! No AF problems, no dust issues, etc – accept I could only get 2-3FPS out of it, even on Continuous High Speed Mode. Why was the D300 shutter speed so slow?

This was a case of blame the user, not the equipment. Sometime in the past, I must have changed the Raw File Bit Rate from 12-bits to 14-bits. This setting taxes the processor more and isn’t able to give you the high burst rate.  Once I changed it back to 12-bits, and I was shooting at a happy 6fps. Having done reading about the real world benefits of 12-bit vs. 14-bit, I’ve decided that when I’m using my D300s as part of my dynamic duo package, speed is more to me than theoretical dynamic range.

If you’re having this issue and you’ve already set it to shoot at 12-bit Raw files, it might be that your SD/CF card is too slow, try a faster one.

Now I’m debating whether I should add a battery grip to this old beauty to get 8fps, but I really haven’t felt that I’ve missed a moment and needed those 2 extra frames – the upgrade would purely be for the machine-gun sound. In the mean time, here are some shots that my old, but as good as gold D300s produces.

American Herring Gull - Shot with the D300s and 70-200mm f4

American Herring Gull - Shot with the D300s and 70-200mm f4

American Herring Gull – Shot with the D300s and 70-200mm f4

American Herring Gull - Shot with the D300s and 70-200mm f4

American Herring Gull – Shot with the D300s and 70-200mm f4

Fall colours in Ontario - Maple Tree in Autumn

Fall colours in Ontario – Maple Tree in Autumn

2 replies
  1. mojo43
    mojo43 says:

    Damn, looks like the D300s is still a good camera! The birds look crisp. I would love to see the metadata on the shots. Focal length and ISO…

    Reply
    • Purazar
      Purazar says:

      Yeah… I was using it previously with a kit 18-200mm lens and the images were respectable, but adding good glass in front of the D300s makes it instantly better. I’ll add a bit of metadata to the captions next time I post pictures. Wasn’t sure if anyone would be interested.

      Reply

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